Saturday, September 01, 2012

Books by Dave Armstrong: The Quotable Augustine: Distinctively Catholic Elements in His Theology


[245 pages. Completed on 1 September 2012 and published by Lulu on the same day]

-- for purchase information, go to the bottom of the page --



Introduction

Excerpts




Index of Topics
[157]



Abortion
Absolution
Adam and Eve
Angels, Intercession of
Anointing the Sick with Consecrated Oil (Sacrament)
Anthropomorphism
Anthropopathism
Apostasy (Falling Away from the Faith or Salvation)
Apostolic Succession
Baptism and Being “Born Again”
Baptism and Justification
Baptism and Salvation
Baptism, Infant
Baptism, Method or Mode of
Baptism of Desire
Baptismal Regeneration
Bishops
Celibacy and Singleness
Christian
Church and Salvation
Church: Authority of
Church: Blaspheming of
Church, Catholic
Church: Fullness of the Faith
Church, Holy Mother
Church, Indefectibility of
Church, Infallibility of
Church: One “True”
Church, Sinners in
Church, Visible
Concupiscence
Confession
Confirmation, Sacrament of
Contraception; Contralife Will
Councils, Ecumenical
Creation Days
Creation Ex Nihilo
Creeds
Cross, Sign of the
Dead: Almsgiving for
Dead: Masses for
Dead: Offerings for
Dead: Prayer for 
Denominationalism; Sectarianism
Deuterocanon (“Apocrypha”)
Development (of Doctrine)
Dissent (from Catholicism)
Divorce
Ecumenism
Eucharist and Salvation
Eucharist: Real Substantial Presence
Eucharistic Adoration
Excommunication
Faith Alone (Falsity of)
Faith and Reason
Faith and Works
Fast: Eucharistic
Fasting and Abstinence
Free Will
Free Will and God’s Foreknowledge
Friday Abstinence
Gentiles: Salvation of, Prior to Christ
Ghosts
God: Circumincession / Coinherence / Perichoresis
God: Immutability, Simplicity, and Self-Sufficiency
God: Impeccability of (Impossibility of Sinning)
God: Middle Knowledge of
God: Omniscience of
God: Outside of Time
God, Providence of
God: Sustainer of Creation
God the Father: Monarchia  / Principatus of
Gospels, Harmony of
Grace: Degrees or Greater Measure of
Grace, Irresistible (Falsity of)
Hades; Sheol; Paradise; Intermediate State
Hardening of the Heart
Healing
Hell (Eternal Punishment)
Heresy; Heretics
Holy Days
Holy Items
Holy Places; Shrines
Holy Spirit: Procession of (Filioque Dispute)
Homosexual Acts
Images, Icons, and Statues: Use and Veneration of
Indulgences
Jesus Christ: “Made Sin”
Jesus Christ: Supposed “Ignorance” of Certain Matters
Jonah and the Whale
Judgment and Works
Judgment of Nations
Justification, Imputed  (Initial)
Justification, Infused (Sanctification)
Lent
Limbo
Marriage: Sacrament
Mary: Mother of God (Theotokos)
Mary: New Eve; Second Eve
Mary: Perpetual Virginity of
Mary: Sinlessness 
Mary: Virginity In Partu (During Childbirth)
Mass, Daily
Mass, Sacrifice of
Mass, Sacrifice of (and the Crucifixion)
Merit
Miracles 
Monks and Nuns; Evangelical Counsels
Mortification and Self-Denial
Original Sin; Fall of Man
Orthodoxy (Correct Beliefs)
Paganism and Christianity
Papacy; Popes
Paul the Apostle: Commissioned by the Church
Penance
Peter: Primacy of
Prayer (of the Righteous)
Priests; Sacrament of Holy Orders
Priests and “Call No Man ‘Father’”
Procreation
Purgatory; Preparation for Heaven in the Afterlife (and This Life)
Rationalism (in Opposition to Faith)
Relics
Reprobation; Causes of Damnation
Roman Primacy
Rule of Faith / “Three-Legged Stool” (Bible-Church-Tradition)
Sacramentals and Sacramentalism
Sacraments
Sacraments and Grace
Sacraments and Salvation
Sacraments: Ex Opere Operato
Saints: Awareness of and Contact with This World
Saints, Communion of
Saints, Incorruptible Bodies of
Saints, Intercession of
Saints, Invocation of
Saints, Veneration of
Schism; Separation
Scripture: Canon of
Scripture: Hermeneutics (Interpretation)
Scripture: Inerrancy and Infallibility
Scripture: Inspiration of
Scripture: Manuscripts
Scripture: Perspicuity (Clearness of)
Scripture: Septuagint (Ancient Greek Translation)
Sin: Mortal and Venial
Suffering, Redemptive (Participation in Christ’s Suffering)
Synergy: Cooperation with God’s Grace as “Co-Laborers”
Theophanies
Theosis; Divinization
Total Depravity (Falsity of); Human Nature
Tradition, Apostolic
Tradition, Oral
Traditions of Men
War, Just
Works, Good (in Grace) 
Worship (Latria)


Bibliography
[all in the public domain and conveniently linked]



COLLECTIONS



Philip Schaff, editor, Early Church Fathers: Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers Series 1 (“NPNF 1”), 14 Volumes (volumes 1-8 devoted to St. Augustine); Buffalo, New York: Christian Literature Publishing Co., 1887; also published in Edinburgh, 1889. Identified by "NPNF 1-2," "NPNF 1-8," etc. (the second number being the particular volume). Available online:

http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/ 
http://www.ccel.org/fathers.html 


Benedictine Fathers, translators, Seventeen Short Treatises of St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo  ["17ST"], Oxford: John Henry Parker, 1847. Available online:

http://books.google.com/books?id=hEUOAAAAYAAJ&dq=st.+augustine,+on+the+Usefulness+of+Believing&source=gbs_navlinks_s



INDIVIDUAL WORKS (CHRONOLOGICAL)


(with chronological dates and Latin titles: taken from the 1995 Internet chart by Allan D. Fitzgerald, O.S.A.: editor of Augustine Through the Ages: An Encyclopedia [Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1999; 952 pages]; also abbreviations, translators, secondary sources, and URLs from the Internet ) 


386-387 Sol. The Soliloquies (Soliloquiorum) [tr. C. C. Starbuck; NPNF 1-7]

387 / 389 Mor.C On the Morals of the Catholic Church (De moribus ecclesiae catholicae) [tr. Richard Stothert; NPNF 1-4]

387 / 389 Mor.M On the Morals of the Manichaeans (De moribus Manichaeorum) [tr. Richard Stothert; NPNF 1-4]



391 Believ. On the Usefulness of Believing (De utilitate credendi) [tr. C. L. Cornish; NPNF 1-3]

392 C.Fortun. Disputation Against Fortunatus [tr. Albert H. Newman; NPNF 1-4]


392 / 393 Soul.c.M Of Two Souls, Against the Manichees (De duabus animabus contra Manichaeos) [tr. Albert H. Newman; NPNF 1-4]

393 F.Creed Of Faith and the Creed (De fide et symbolo) [tr. S. D. F. Salmond; NPNF 1-3]


393 / 394 S.Mount On the Sermon on the Mount [Bk I / Bk II] (De sermone Domini in monte) [tr. William Findlay; NPNF 1-6]

393 Cat.Creed Sermon to Catechumens on the Creed [tr. by H. Browne; NPNF 1-3]



396 Confl. On the Christian Conflict (De agone christiano) [tr. Benedictine Fathers; 17ST]


396-426 Doctr. On Christian Doctrine (De doctrina christiana) [tr. James Shaw; NPNF 1-2]


396-420 E.Ps. Expositions on the Psalms (Enarrationes in Psalmos) [tr. J. E. Tweed; NPNF 1-8]


397 C.Fund.M Against the Fundamental Epistle of Manichaeus (Contra epistulam quam vocant fundamenti) [tr. Richard Stothert; NPNF 1-4]

397-401 Conf. The Confessions (Confessiones) [tr. J. G. Pilkington; NPNF 1-1]


397-398 C.Faust. Against Faustus the Manichee (Contra Faustum Manichaeum) [tr. Richard Stothert; NPNF 1-4]


399 Good On the Nature of Good (De natura boni) [tr. Albert H. Newman; NPNF 1-4]



399-419 Trin. On the Trinity (De trinitate) [tr. Arthur West Haddan; NPNF 1-3]


400 Harm.G. Harmony of the Gospels (De consensu evangelistarum) [tr. S. D. F. Salmond; NPNF 1-6]



400 Monks On the Work of Monks (De opere monachorum) [tr. by H. Browne; NPNF 1-3]



400 Cat.U. On Catechizing the Uninstructed (De catechizandis rudibus) [tr. S. D. F. Salmond; NPNF 1-3]



400 / 401 Bapt. On Baptism, Against the Donatists (De baptismo) [tr. J. R. King; rev. Chester D. Hartranft; NPNF 1-4]



401 Marr. On the Good of Marriage (De bono coniugale) [tr. C. L. Cornish; NPNF 1-3]


401 Virg. On Holy Virginity (De sancta virginate) [tr. C. L. Cornish; NPNF 1-3]


401 / 405 C.Pet. Against the Letters of Petilian the Donatist (Contra litteras Petiliani) [tr. J. R. King; rev. Chester D. Hartranft; NPNF 1-4]



406-430 L.John Lectures on the Gospel of John (In euangelium Ioannis tractatus) [tr. John Gibb; NPNF 1-7]


407 / 409 H.1Jn Homilies on the First Epistle of John (Tractatus in epistolam Ioannis ad Parthos) [tr. by H. Browne; NPNF 1-7]

412 Sin.I.Bapt. On Merit and the Forgiveness of Sins and on Infant Baptism (De peccatorum meritis et remissione et de baptismo parvulorum) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]

412 Sp.L On the Spirit and the Letter (De spiritu et littera) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]

412 / 413 F.Works On Faith and Works (De fide et operibus) [tr. Benedictine Fathers; 17ST



413-427 City City of God (De civitate Dei) [tr. Marcus Dods; NPNF 1-2]


414 / 415 Nat. On Nature and Grace (De natura et gratia) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]


415 / 416 Perf. On Man's Perfection in Righteousness (De perfectione iustitiae) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]

417 P.Pel. On the Proceedings of Pelagius (De gestis Pelagii) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]


418 Grace.Orig. On the Grace of Christ and on Original Sin (De gratia Christi et de peccato originali) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]


419 / 420 M.Concup. On Marriage and Concupiscence (De nuptiis et concupiscentia) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]



420 C.Ep.Pel. Against Two Letters of the Pelagians (Contra duas epistulas Pelagianorum) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]



420-422 Dead On the Care of the Dead (De cura pro mortuis gerenda) [tr. by H. Browne; NPNF 1-3]


421-422 Ench. Enchiridion: Handbook on Faith, Hope, and Love (Enchiridion ad Laurentium) [tr. J. F. Shaw; NPNF 1-3]


426 / 427 Grace.Free On Grace and Free Will (De gratia et libero arbitrio) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]


426 / 427 Reb.Gr. On Rebuke and Grace (De correptione et gratia) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]



428 / 429 Pred. On the Predestination of the Saints (De praedestinatione sanctorum) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]


428 / 429 Persev. On the Gift of Perseverance (De dono perseverantiae) [tr. Peter Holmes and Robert E. Wallis, rev. Benjamin B. Warfield; NPNF 1-5]


386-429 Ep.[#] Letters (Epistulae) [tr. J. G. Cunningham; NPNF 1-1]

393-430 Serm. Sermons on the New Testament (Sermones) [tr. R. G. MacMullen; NPNF 1-6]



INDIVIDUAL WORKS (BY ABBREVIATION)


Bapt. On Baptism, Against the Donatists (De baptismo) 400 / 401
Believ. On the Usefulness of Believing (De utilitate credendi) 391 
C.Ep.Pel. Against Two Letters of the Pelagians (Contra duas epistulas Pelagianorum) 420 
C.Faust. Against Faustus the Manichee (Contra Faustum Manichaeum) 397-398
C.Fortun. Disputation Against Fortunatus 392
C.Fund.M Against the Fundamental Epistle of Manichaeus (Contra epistulam quam vocant fundamenti) 397 
C.Pet. Against the Letters of Petilian the Donatist (Contra litteras Petiliani) 401 / 405
Cat.Creed Sermon to Catechumens on the Creed 393
Cat.U. On Catechizing the Uninstructed (De catechizandis rudibus) 400  
City City of God (De civitate Dei) 413-427
Conf. The Confessions (Confessiones) 397-401
Confl. On the Christian Conflict (De agone christiano) 396

Dead On the Care of the Dead (De cura pro mortuis gerenda) 420-422 
Doctr. On Christian Doctrine (De doctrina christiana) 396-426
E.Ps. Expositions on the Psalms (Enarrationes in Psalmos) 396-420
Ench. Enchiridion: Handbook on Faith, Hope, and Love (Enchiridion ad Laurentium) 421-422
Ep. [#] Letters (Epistulae) 386-429 
F.Creed Of Faith and the Creed (De fide et symbolo) 393 
F.Works On Faith and Works (De fide et operibus) 412 / 413 
Good On the Nature of Good (De natura boni) 399
Grace.Free On Grace and Free Will (De gratia et libero arbitrio) 426 / 427
Grace.Orig. On the Grace of Christ and on Original Sin (De gratia Christi et de peccato originali) 418
H.1Jn Homilies on the First Epistle of John (Tractatus in epistolam Ioannis ad Parthos) 407 / 409
Harm.G. Harmony of the Gospels (De consensu evangelistarum) 400
L.John Lectures on the Gospel of John (In euangelium Ioannis tractatus) 406-430 
M.Concup. On Marriage and Concupiscence (De nuptiis et concupiscentia) 419 / 420 
Marr. On the Good of Marriage (De bono coniugale) 401  
Monks On the Work of Monks (De opere monachorum) 400 
Mor.C On the Morals of the Catholic Church (De moribus ecclesiae catholicae) 387 / 389 
Mor.M On the Morals of the Manichaeans (De moribus Manichaeorum) 387 / 389
Nat. On Nature and Grace (De natura et gratia) 414 / 415 
P.Pel. On the Proceedings of Pelagius (De gestis Pelagii) 417
Perf. On Man's Perfection in Righteousness (De perfectione iustitiae) 415 / 416
Persev. On the Gift of Perseverance (De dono perseverantiae) 428 / 429
Pred. On the Predestination of the Saints (De praedestinatione sanctorum) 428 / 429
Reb.Gr. On Rebuke and Grace (De correptione et gratia) 426 / 427 
S.Mount On the Sermon on the Mount (De sermone Domini in monte) 393 / 394
Serm. Sermons on the New Testament 393-430 
Sin.I.Bapt. On Merit and the Forgiveness of Sins and on Infant Baptism (De peccatorum meritis et remissione et de baptismo parvulorum) 412
Sol. The Soliloquies (Soliloquiorum) 386-387 
Soul.c.M Of Two Souls, Against the Manichees (De duabus animabus contra Manichaeos) 392 / 393
Sp.L On the Spirit and the Letter (De spiritu et littera)  412 
Trin. On the Trinity (De trinitate) 399-419 
Virg. On Holy Virginity (De sancta virginate) 401 

Back Cover 



Purchase Information



Paperback (List: $20.95 / 20% Lulu Discount: $16.76)

http://www.lulu.com/shop/dave-armstrong/pope-francis-explained-survey-of-myths-legends-and-catholic-defenses-in-harmony-with-tradition/ebook/product-21413577.html
$6.99 / $4.68 (if you buy 3-4 of my e-books) / $4.19 (if you buy 5-9) / $3.50 (if you buy 10+)
 
http://biblicalcatholicism.com/products/a-biblical-defense-of-catholicism
$6.99 / $4.68 (if you buy 3-4 of my e-books) / $4.19 (if you buy 5-9) / $3.50 (if you buy 10+)
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dave-armstrong/pope-francis-explained-survey-of-myths-legends-and-catholic-defenses-in-harmony-with-tradition/ebook/product-21412727.html
$2.99 / $2.00 (if you buy 3-4 of my e-books) / $1.79 (if you buy 5-9) / $1.50 (if you buy 10+)

$6.99 

$6.99 

$6.99

Updated on 13 April 2014.



***

11 comments:

jack calvin said...

I think its obvious that if Christianity is ever to be united again, we're going to have to throw away Augustine and his hideous views which tend to sola-fideanism and antinomianism, and go back to the pre-Augustinian view of the first 4 centuries of the church which presents a more healthy view of man after the fall and a more gospel view of Christ's atonement. Until both Catholics and Protestants agree that Augustine is a pox on both our houses I think no real progress can be made toward unification.

Dave Armstrong said...

It's odd that you would make this (erroneous) charge, when I was just posting the following on my Facebook page:

But, they say, of that unbelief alone, whereby they believed not in Christ, he willed them to repent. Wonderful presumption! (I would not give it a heavier name,) when, upon that being heard which was said, Repent ye, it is said to have been of unbelief alone, whereas the evangelic teaching delivered a change of life from the old unto the new, wherein certainly that also is contained which the Apostle lays down in that sentence, Let him that stole, steal no more; and the rest, wherein he follows out what it is to lay aside the old man, and to put on the new. . . . Now therefore, if they will, let them endeavour to maintain, that he saves himself from this perverse generation, who only believes in Christ, although he continue in what scandalous sins soever he will, even unto the making profession of adultery. Which if it be impious to assert, let them who are to be baptized hear, not only what they ought to believe, but also how they may save themselves from this perverse generation. For in that case it is necessary that they hear how, believing, they ought to walk, . . . (On Faith and Works, 13)

What the Lord Himself, to pass over other things, when that rich man sought of Him, what good thing he should do, that he might attain life eternal, let them call to mind what He answered; If thou wilt come, said He, unto life, keep the Commandments. [Matthew 19:17] But he said, What? Then the Lord made mention of the Commandments of the Law, Thou shall not kill, Thou shall not commit adultery, and the rest. Whereupon when he had made answer that he had performed these from his youth, He added also a Commandment of perfection, that he should sell all that he had, and give in alms unto the poor, and have treasure in heaven, and follow the same Lord. Let them then see that it was not said unto him that he should believe and be baptized, by the aid of which alone those men think that a man comes unto life; but commandments of morals were given unto the man, which certainly without faith cannot be guarded and observed. Neither, however, because in this place the Lord appears to have been silent as to the suggestion of faith, do we lay down and contend, that we are to state commandments of morals alone to men who desire to attain unto life. For both are connected the one with the other, as I said before; because neither can the love of God exist in a man who loveth not his neighbour, nor the love of his neighbour in him who loveth not God. And so at times we find that Scripture makes mention of the one without the other, either this or that, in place of the full doctrine, so that even in this way we may understand that the one cannot exist without the other: because both he who believes in God ought to do what God commands; and he who therefore does it because God commands it, must of necessity believe in God. (On Faith and Works, 20)

Dave Armstrong said...

And again:

Wherefore let us now consider that, which ought to be cast forth from the hearts of religious persons, that they lose not their own salvation through evil security, if they shall think faith sufficient in order to attain to it, and shall neglect to live well, and in good works to hold the way of God. (On Faith and Works, 21)

jack calvin said...

You know good and well the only writings of Augustine anyone reads are the anti-pelagian ones where he teaches it is impossible to live morally without being zapped by grace and thus puts forth the impression that we should be Calvinist-antinomian-faith-onlyists. This is one of the problems with a guy like Augustine: he wrote too much. I prefer a church father who's writings are finite and can all actually be read, like a Justin Martyr.

Dave Armstrong said...

Nice try. You made the claim that this is what he taught, period: not that folks only read his anti-Pelagian writings, and that they supposedly teach faith alone (which they do not, either: I know, since I've been reading them in preparing this book).

Nor is it "faith only" or antinomian to say that we need to have God's grace in order to be saved and justified. Those are things that Catholics and Protestants and Orthodox agree upon (grace alone or sola gratia).

Luther and Calvin (unfortunately) formally separated sanctification from justification (and salvation), but on the other hand, both made it very clear (I've documented it myself) that an authentic faith would inevitably be accompanied by good works. That is practically no different from the Catholic position.

jack calvin said...

Furthermore, it simply indicates that Augustine was inconsistent (which ought to be a duh). Anyone whose theology fueled the likes of Luther and Calvin must have been inconsistent.

Dave Armstrong said...

Well, he really didn't. They wrongly co-opted him, which is what this book will prove, and which has already been shown in many papers on this blog and in my book on the Church fathers.

Now you blame Augustine for how Luther and Calvin distorted his teachings and pretended that he agreed with them when he didn't. That takes considerable chutzpah and is, needless to say, quite an uncharitable judgment.

jack calvin said...

"Nor is it 'faith only' or antinomian to say that we need to have God's grace in order to be saved and justified."

I said nothing about being justified/saved but living morally. To say that we cannot live morally without being zapped by grace is antinomian. Saved/justified is a different conversation altogether. The main problem with Augustine is that his theology has formed the modern concept of "born that way" which is used to legitimize every sin as a "valid life choice" but especially to legitimize homosexuality. Once you say we are "born sinners" (i.e. original sin) its only a hair away from saying people are born gay. If ever there was a time to roll back the clock to the theology of a Justin Martyr its now. Original sin will do nothing for us in the coming decades and centuries except provide an excuse for the worst types of sin and sinners.

Edward T. Babinski said...

Dave, great job with all the links!

I've been collecting some Augustine passages myself, for years, but not necessarily the most endearing ones. We'll have to compare lists when your book is done.

Having read your comment section I know you must realize that Christians are the greatest debunkers of each other's views, it's endless really. There's an infinity of terms, nuances, one can nitpick as a theologian. Even broader topics are not beyond debate as conservatives debate moderates debate liberals. It's endless.

Have you written a book about what really matters? What would be in it? How long do you think it would be?

Dave Armstrong said...

What is it that you think really matters, Ed? I have 31 books. Perhaps one or a portion of one of those has a bit about what you think really matters. :-) But we must define our terms first.

The latest from "Jack Calvin" is too ridiculous to deserve any dignity of response. I'll let it stand in all its absurd glory, as its own refutation.

Maroun said...

Jack Calvin . I don`t want to accuse you of being an ignorant (at least not yet ) but i humbly truly believe that you don`t even know the meaning of antinomianism . Antinomianism means no law , it means that some believed that since we are saved by grace through faith , then there is no need for us to obey the law or to do good works . Is this what saint Augustine taught according to you? That`s a false accusation sir . Saint Augustine always insisted on good works but not without the grace of God (do you disagree with that?) do you even remember the words of our Lord Jesus Christ Himself who is the truth and never lies when He said , without me there is nothing you can do (John 15:5 ) .
Now if you agree with Pelagius , that you don`t need the grace of God to do good works and you believe that you have the power to do good , then i humbly disagree with you . Your way of thinking will lead people to believe that they don`t need God , not only that , but you are also ungrateful for what God did for you . In fact , if you have the power already in yourself to do good deeds , then why should you need God or His grace?
You see , even the non believers , if they do good , it is always God doing through them , they just (sometimes ) don`t recognize it and don`t give glory to God...
Let me ask you or give you the same example which saint Augustine gave to the Pelagians which insisted on free will alone . He proved to them that free will alone is not sufficient when he gave this example . He said , let`s take a paralyzed person and ask him to walk , will he be able to?the answer was no,then he asked , why not , does he not have a free will?the answer was yes,then he asked , does he not wish to walk?the answer again was yes , then he said , so even though he does have free will,and he wants to walk,but it`s not enough because he is paralyzed and needs to be made healthy first and then his free will cooperating with the grace of God will make him able to walk . Do you understand now why free will alone is not enough?
So please stop falsely accusing saint Augustine of causing antinomianism when he insisted so much in everything he wrote about obeying God with the help of God of course .And as Dave told you , if some persons or many , like Luther , Calvin and many others did and still do misunderstand or misinterpret saint Augustine , don`t accuse him but accuse them . Saint Augustine is responsible for what he wrote and not for what the others understand .