Monday, July 21, 2008

Catholic Sources on Celtic Christianity and a Supposed "Celtic Church" Separate From Rome

[CelticCross2.jpg]

Muiredach's Cross, Monasterboice

[ source ]


I don't recall ever having written on Celtic Christianity, myself, though I may have in passing, or have forgotten about something. I used to have some links on my old "England" and/or Anglican web pages (both now defunct), as I recall.

I think a lot of this thought that there was a separate entity: the "Celtic Church" in the British Isles, is essentially similar to the ecclesiological thought of Orthodoxy, and so can sometimes be dealt with in the same fashion, from a Catholic perspective.

GENERAL

"Celtic Coptic Anglicans? A Modern Myth to Dodge the Authority of Rome," Fr. Dwight Longenecker (This Rock, Nov. 2006)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Synod of Whitby" (664)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "The Anglo-Saxon Church"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "The Celtic Rite"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Ancient Diocese and Monastery of Lindisfarne"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "School of Iona"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "The Monastic School of Aran"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Scotland"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Ireland"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Archdiocese of Dublin"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Dioceses of Kildare and Leighlin"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Diocese of Ossory"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Welsh Church"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Glastonbury Abbey"
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Diocese of Canterbury"

EARLY CELTIC OR ANGLO-SAXON SAINTS

Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Alban" (d.c. 304)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Ninian" (d.c. 432)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Patrick" (c. 390-c. 460)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Brigid" (c. 452-525)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Brendan" (484-577)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Columba (Columcille)" (521-597)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Baithen of Iona" (536-c. 600)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Canice (Kenneth)" (c. 516-600)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. David" (d.c. 601)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Comgall" (c. 520-602)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Augustine of Canterbury" (d. 604)
"The Mission of St. Augustine of Canterbury to the English," Dr. Ghazwan Butrous.
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Columbanus" (543-615)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Kevin (Coemgen)" (d. 618)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Lawrence" (d. 619)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Mellitus" (d. 624)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Aedan of Ferns" (c. 550-632)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Edwin" (c. 586-633)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Cronan" (d. 640)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Aidan of Lindisfarne" (d. 642)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Oswald" (c. 605-642)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Paulinus" (d. 644)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Finan" (d. 661)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Cedd (Cedda)" (d. 664)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Ronan" (d. 665)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Ceatta (Chad)" (d. 672)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Colman" (c. 605-676)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Caedmon" (d.c. 670-680)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Eata" (d. 686)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Cuthbert" (c. 635-687)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "Theodore, Abp. of Canterbury" (c. 602-690)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Adamnan" (c. 624-704)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Wilfrid" (634-709)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Adrian of Canterbury" (d. 710)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "The Venerable Bede" (c. 673-735)
Venerable Bede on the Conversion of England (Medieval Sourcebook)
Venerable Bede on the Synod of Whitby (Britannia Historical Documents)
Catholic Encyclopedia: "St. Boniface (Winfrid)" (d.c. 755)


ADDITIONAL NON-CATHOLIC SOURCES
"Celtic Saints" (Among the Cloud of Irish Witnesses)
"Celtic Saints and the Early Church" (Celtic Twilight)
"Celtic Monasticism: History and Spirituality," Dr. Deborah Vess
"Celtic Church" (Infoplease)
Firth's Celtic Scotland and the Age of the Saints (website)
"Book of Kells" (Wikipedia) (c. 800)
"Anglo-Saxon Saints" (Wikipedia)
"Anglo-Saxon Christianity" (Wikipedia)
"Celtic Christianity" (Wikipedia)
Quote:
It is easy to exaggerate the cohesiveness of the Celtic Christian communities. Scholars have long recognised that the term “Celtic Church” is simply inappropriate to describe Christianity among Celtic-speaking peoples, since this would imply a notion of unity, or a self-identifying entity, that simply did not exist.[4] As Patrick Wormald explained, “One of the common misconceptions is that there was a ‘Roman Church’ to which the ‘Celtic’ was nationally opposed.”[5] Celtic-speaking areas were part of Latin Christendom as a whole, wherein a significant degree of liturgical and structural variation existed, along with a collective veneration of the Bishop of Rome that was no less intense in Celtic areas.[6]
"Cornish Saints" (Wikipedia)
"Hilda of Whitby" (c. 614-680) (Wikipedia)

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